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Career and Technical Education Courses

Technology Today
Course 13220
0.5 credit
Grades 9-10.
All future jobs will require an understanding of technology. Explore current and future technologies in the fields of Construction, Communication, Manufacturing and Transportation. You will experiment in the areas of architecture, electronics, automotive technology, computers and engineering drawing. Through these activities, you will learn which of these areas might interest you for future course selections and career choices.

Computer Graphics & Design I
Course 13170
1.0 credit
This is a full year course that introduces the student to the fundamental skills and knowledge needed to understand graphic design. Computer skill and design/drawing process are developed through a series of project-based assignments. Computer skills are honed using a wide range of computer software such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and PageMaker, and Macromedia Freehand, Fireworks and Flash Animation. Projects include activities such as sketching, symbol/logo design, typography, illustration, photo editing, t-shirt design and silk-screening, and animation. Note: Course qualifies for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts graduation requirement.

Computer Graphics & Design II
Course 13180
1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Graphic Arts I.
In this course the student will continue to develop the skills and knowledge learned in Graphic Arts 1. The students will expand their knowledge and skill levels using programs such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Premiere and PageMaker, and Macromedia Freehand, Fireworks and Flash Animation. Emphasis will be placed on developing the creative skills necessary to design printed materials and large-scale conceptual projects; such as computer and stop action animation. Note: Course qualifies for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts graduation requirement.

Computer Graphics & Design III
Course 13190
1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Graphic Arts II.
This course is designed for the student who is serious about pursuing a career in the graphics field. The student will apply prior knowledge and the skills developed in Graphic Arts I and II to create portfolio pieces that are self-directed. Emphasis is placed on developing the computer and creative skills necessary to design pieces that effectively communicate information and meaning. Note: Course qualifies for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts graduation requirement.

Electronics I
Course 13110
0.5 credit
Grades 9-12. Course approved for Applied Mathematics.
Electronics I is a course dealing with basic electronic components such as resistors, inductors and transistors as well as the operation of all major electronic measurement and test equipment. Electronic construction techniques and kit building will be emphasized. Students will be designing and drawing electrical schematics.

Electronics II
Course 13120
0.5 credit
Grades 9-12. Offered Semester 2.
Course approved for Applied Mathematics.
Prerequisite: Electronics I
Electronics II offers instruction in the operating principles of semiconductor components commonly used in electronic equipment such as stereos, computers, VCRs and radio controlled model cars. Students will work with solid-state amplifiers, oscillators, operational amplifiers and integrated circuits. Advanced electronics testing techniques will be covered throughout the course.

Automation & Robotics
Course 13040
2.0 credits (2 hour block)
Grades 10-12.
Prerequisite: Electronics I and II or approval of instructor.
Course approved for Applied Mathematics. This course meets the 20-hour Online requirement. This course will introduce students to basic automation/robotics systems. Topics to be covered include mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical control systems. This course deals extensively with problem solving and troubleshooting hydraulic systems, air logic circuits, relay ladder diagrams, programmable controllers and motor controls as applied to manufacturing technology.

Independent Study in Robotics
Course 13041
0.5 credit
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Automation Robotics and approval of instructor.

Engineering Drawing/CAD I
Course 13130
1.0 credit
Grades 9-12.
Course approved for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts or Applied Mathematics.
Introduction to Engineering Drawing using the scale, triangles, templates and compass properly. Develop multiple views of objects and dimension them. As sectioned parts and 3-D drawings are constructed, students see how products are manufactured. As this “The Language of Technology” is being studied, the student will also make drawings on the computer (CAD) and generate hard copies on the plotter. Students begin to learn skills needed to become a drafting detailer (employment out of high school). Students can earn dual credits for technical level classes at local community colleges. Students learn drawing and CAD skills that are expected of them as they enter technical or engineering programs in college.

Engineering Drawing/CAD II
Course 13140
1.0 credit
Grades 10-12.
Prerequisite: Engineering Drawing/CAD I
Course approved for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts or Applied Mathematics.
Course is divided into two parts, one with an engineering focus and the other with architectural elements. In the first part, students will develop their visual communication skills in the creations of auxiliary views and working drawings. They will also develop engineering-related skills in geometric constructions and the use of specific dimensioning conventions. Along with the traditional drafting skills, students will increase their knowledge and skills using the computer, especially in the areas of three-dimensional modeling. The second part will deal with the basics of residential architecture. Students will study the techniques of proper room layout and will be able to read a completed set of house plans. By the end of this part, they will have a set of house plans that include floor, site, foundation, and elevation plans.

Engineering Drawing/CAD III
Course 13150
1.0 credit
Grades 11-12.
Prerequisite: Engineering Drawing/CAD II
Course approved for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts or Applied Mathematics.
This course teaches advanced engineering drawing skills. Students will spend the majority of their time using engineering drawing software packages, especially AutoCAD and Mechanical Desktop. They will develop both two-dimensional and three-dimensional drafting skills. This class studies the design of gears and cams along with incorporating specifications and calculations. Students will also be responsible for developing drawings that use manufacturing processes. The student will conclude the class by selecting a working drawing in the field of his/her choice. Students may select a mechanical, welding, piping, electrical, aeronautical, or civil engineering drawing and develop it to the best of their abilities. A finished portfolio including all their work will be required of the students who take this course.

Architectural and Computer Aided Design
1.0 credit
Course 13030
Grades 11-12.
Prerequisite: Engineering Drawing/CAD II
Course approved for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts or Applied Mathematics or 20-hour online requirement. This course is a graphical study of architecture. Students will study how current building materials and methods are used to produce the post-modern designs using both traditional and computer-aided design. They will learn how to combine exterior features such as rooflines with doors, windows, and wall coverings. Proper sizes of rooms and location of plumbing fixtures, doors, and appliances will be included. Students will draw a complete set of house plans. These will include a plot, foundation, floor, plumbing, electrical, front and rear elevations and section details. Related study will include community planning and building codes. Students will learn to calculate the amount of building materials needed, structural loads on beams and allowable joist spans. Students will develop a major project that will take the entire year to complete. This project, a residential house plan, will incorporate the necessary information that architectural drawings contain. By the end of the school year, the students should have a completed set of prints, and possibly a scale model or architectural rendering of their house plan.

Intro to Auto Paint
Course 13050
1.0 credit
Grades 10-12.
Course approved for Applied Mathematics.
Intro to Auto Paint is a full year course in applying basecoat and clearcoat systems, repairing damage to auto panels and custom painting techniques. Learn extensive spraying techniques and the art of applying flames, stripes and fading of colors.

Collision Repair
Course 13080
2.0 credits (2 hour block)
Grades 11-12.
Course approved for Applied Mathematics.
Collision Repair is a full year course in bumping, metal finishing, sheet metal, painting and assembling. Working with damaged cars will be an important facet of this course. Students will work with body working tools, oxyacetylene and MIG welders. Plastic and fiberglass repair equipment and spray gun equipment will be used extensively in this course.

Auto Mechanics I
Course 13060
1.0 credit
Course approved for Applied Mathematics.
Auto Mechanics I is a pre-vocational course open to students interested in pursuing auto mechanics as a possible career. During the semester, students will be instructed in the proper use of automotive tools and equipment. Further, students will also be instructed on all of the major systems of the automobile.

Advanced Automotive Technology
2.0 credits (2 hour block)
Course 13010
Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics I or instructor permission
Course approved for Applied Mathematics.
This course is a vocation-structured course designed for the serious-minded student who has a special interest in advanced automobile techniques and modern diagnostic service procedures. Emphasis is placed on the student’s future career in the automotive industry.

Automobile Service and Maintenance
0.5 credit
Course 13070
Grades 10-12.
Course approved for Applied Mathematics.
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the basic parts and systems of the automobile. The course will be structured around basic minor maintenance, care and upkeep of the automobile. Not open to current and previous Auto Mechanics I students.

Educational Foundations/Kiddie Kampus
2.0 credits (2-hour block)
Course 13310
Grades 11-12.
Thinking about a career working with children or becoming a teacher? This yearlong class will introduce you to the field of education and provide an extensive understanding of children. Students study child development and educational theory, then apply skills they have learned in our on-site preschool, Kiddie Kampus. You will plan, prepare and create lessons and activities for the preschool students. You will also learn effective methods for working with children of all ages and practice these methods by working directly with the children enrolled in Kiddie Kampus. The only requirements for the class are to provide a record of a current TB skin test and a current physical. Upon turning eighteen years of age, students must provide Family Independence Agency clearance. This is a state mandated requirement that insures staff or volunteers having contact with the children are not on the central registry for substance abuse or neglect.

Hospitality and Culinary Arts: Exploration
1.0 credit
Course 13375
Grades 10-12.
Thinking about becoming a chef? This class is for students considering a food service career or who are interested in building culinary skill. Using a program called ProStart, designed with support from the National Restaurant Association (NRA), students learn to research and create their own menu items, prepare, package, cost, and market various food projects for sale. Labs will include preparing entrees, soup, butchery, breakfast foods, cookies, breads, and a variety of other bakery and pastry items. Students will also learn industry safety and sanitation, in addition to restaurant business. Course content assists students in obtaining the NRA certificate. This class qualifies for Hospitality and Culinary Arts Co-op credit. Course is approved for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts or Applied Mathematics.

Hospitality and Culinary Arts: Restaurant Operation
Course 13380
Course 13382
2.0 credits (2 hour block)
Grades 11-12.
Both course numbers required to register for this class. See counselor for scheduling details. Interested in becoming a chef? Considering a career as a hotel or restaurant manager? Come join our team in the Salem Rock Café, the Park restaurant. Students are trained on the job for careers in the restaurant, food service, and hospitality business. Using the nationally recognized Pro-Start Certification Curriculum, students gain hands-on experience in the areas of dining room service, short-order cooking and quantity food production. Students are trained in a commercial kitchen, using the same equipment used in the workplace. Culinary skills learned include knife skills, soups and hot food productions, butchery, cold food production, bakery and pastries. In addition, students gain experience in menu design and pricing, scheduling and menu forecasting, writing health conscious menus and following industry trends, budgeting, and register use. Students in this class qualify to test for the ServSafe license, as well as the Pro-Start Certificate of Achievement. Students also qualify for specialized scholarships and college credits for select colleges. This class qualifies for the Co-op Credit. This course qualifies for the Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts credit, and the Applied Mathematics credit.

Health Occupations
Course 13510
2.0 credits (2 hour block)
Grades 11-12.
Qualifies as 1 science-related elective credit.
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students who enroll in this course have a strong interest and aptitude for science. Eligible students should have earned a C or better in their previous Biology class. The Health Occupations course is one year, two hour block, career and technical education course designed to provide students with a strong academic knowledge base in health science. The anatomy and physiology component of the program will cover the systems of the human body. Diseases, disorders and medical terminology related to each system will be studied. Medical ethics, OSHA safety practices, universal precautions, teamwork, communications, employability skills, and health maintenance practices will be taught throughout the course. Students will be introduced to a number of health care careers and will be exposed to specialized equipment used in the health care field. They will learn many basic transferable skills required by a variety of health science occupations. Class time will be divided between classroom instruction, note taking, class discussion, viewing videos, computer based instruction and assessments, written assignments and tests. Classroom laboratories are also incorporated in order to give students the opportunity to practice and use information received in classroom instruction. Students will be certified in Professional Rescuer CPR and First Aid as part of the curriculum. Students who are enrolled in this class are encouraged to become members of HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America). This course cannot be taken during the same academic year as Medical Career Foundations. Students earn one elective credit and one science credit upon successful completion of this course.

Teacher Assistant 0.5 credit
Semester 1 Course 15225
0.5 credit
Semester 2 Course 15226
Grade 11-12
The Teacher Assistant Course provides students with classroom and field experiences that will enable them to make informed decisions regarding careers in education. Students enrolled in this course will be given opportunities to gain and develop valuable leadership and interpersonal skills. This course allows students to explore diverse career options in education, observe, explore, and utilize effective teaching practices, recognize aspects of human growth and development that relate to learning, develop and demonstrate leadership, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and self-evaluation skills and experience tutoring and mentoring other students at all levels.
Pre-Requisite: • Grade point average of 3.0 • Exemplary Attendance • Mature and responsible behavior as verified by: o Teacher recommendation o Counselor approval o Administrator approval o Program Coordinator approval